24 October 2018

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World Breastfeeding Week

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Thursday August 2, 2018

Kabul (BNA) Breastfeeding; best way to provide infants with nutrients they need World Breastfeeding Week is marked every year from 1st to 7th August to encourage breastfeeding and improve the health of babies throughout the world.
World Breastfeeding Week was first celebrated in 1992 by World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) and is now observed in over 125 countries by UNICEF, WHO and their partners including individuals, organizations, and governments. Breastfeeding is the best way to provide infants with the nutrients they need. WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding starting within one hour after birth until a baby is 6 months old. Nutritious complementary foods should then be added while continuing to breastfeed for up to 2 years or beyond.
This year, WHO is working with UNICEF and partners to promote the importance of helping mothers breastfeed their babies within that crucial first hour of life. Skin-to-skin contact along with suckling at the breast stimulate the production of breast-milk, including colostrum, also called the baby’s ‘first vaccine’, which is extremely rich in nutrients and antibodies. It is very necessary to the mothers to get timely support and healthcare education to their baby including breast feeding. The continuous support and intimation can bring the gradual and permanent changes in the social living and ultimately healthy and disease free social living. Breastfeeding has lots of benefits to both newborn baby and mother. The following are some benefits of breastfeeding:
– Breast milk contains everything your baby needs for the first six months of life, with the possible exception of vitamin D. The first milk is thick, rich in protein and loaded with beneficial compounds.
– Breast milk is loaded with antibodies, especially immune-globin A, which can help prevent or fight illness in your baby.
– Breastfeeding may reduce your baby’s risk of infections and many diseases, including allergy, celiac disease and diabetes.
– Breastfeeding may affect your baby’s brain development and reduce the risk of future behavior and learning problems.
– Breastfeeding may make weight loss harder for the first 3 months after delivery. However, it may actually help with weight loss after the first 3 months.
– Breastfeeding increases oxytocin production, a hormone that causes contractions in the uterus. It reduces blood loss after delivery and helps the uterus return to its previous smaller size.
– Breastfeeding mothers are less likely to develop postpartum depression.
They have increased amounts of oxytocin in their system, which encourages caregiving, relaxation and bonding between mother and child.
– Breastfeeding for more than one year is linked to a 28% lower risk of breast and ovarian cancer. It has also been linked to a reduced risk of several other diseases.
Lailuma Noori
 

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