13 December 2018

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Monday, December 03, 2018

US President Donald Trump has written a letter to Prime Minister Imran Khan seeking Islamabad’s assistance in peace talks with the Afghan Taliban, Express News reported.
Addressing a meeting with journalists in Islamabad, the premier revealed that Trump, in his letter, sought Pakistan’s assistance in the Afghan peace process.
He further said that the US president had lauded Pakistan’s role and stressed over achieving peace.
Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry confirmed Trump’s call for support. “President Trump has written a letter. He has asked for Pakistan’s cooperation to bring the Taliban into talks,” Chaudhry told Reuters.
PM Imran vows to transform lives of differently-abled persons
The letter from the US president came after a war of words between the two head of the states.
Imran further added that he had always believed only dialogue could bring stability in Afghanistan.
On November 19, the roller-coaster relationship between the two countries touched a new low when President Trump fired off a fresh tirade against Pakistan, triggering an angry retort from PM Imran and his cabinet members.
Premier Imran highlighted that Pakistan is among few allies who suffered 75,000 casualties in the US War on Terror in Afghanistan in response to Trump’s statement that “Pakistan don’t do a thing for us” in a Fox News interview.
The US president’s remarks came after he tried to defend his government’s decision to reduce military aid for Pakistan.
During the interview, Trump claimed that Pakistan, despite knowing the whereabouts of Osama Bin Laden, harboured the terrorist in Abbottabad before the US commandos eventually gunned him down in a raid in 2011.
 

Monday November 12, 2018

Kabul (BNA) Former Afghan refugee Safiya Wazir recently won an upset victory in the New Hampshire Democratic primary against four-term State Representative Dick Patten.
By winning the Democratic primary for the 17th district of New Hampshire, she is on track to become the first refugee to ever serve public office in the state of New Hampshire.
She will face Republican candidate Dennis Soucy in the general election in November.
Wazir, 27, fled Afghanistan with her family when she was six years old and arrived in the U.S. in 2007.
After settling in Concord, New Hampshire, she made a new home in the United States, eventually becoming a citizen.
While the victory came as a surprise, it was absolute. Wazir dealt a heavy blow to incumbent Patten, winning 327 to 143 in Tuesday’s primary.
"Thank you to all my supporters who helped me win tonight’s Dem. primary. I will work hard for all the residents of Ward8," Wazir said on Twitter.
The newly-elected Democratic nominee is running on a campaign platform of advocating for school safety, access to health care and equal housing and economic opportunities.
M.A.Ansari
 

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
WASHINGTON: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Tuesday renewed calls on Pakistan to curb extremists fighting in Afghanistan, saying Washington was holding its uneasy war partner accountable. Pompeo made the comment as he welcomed long-delayed legislative elections in Afghanistan, saying the United States was "encouraged" by voter turnout, despite reports of widespread problems including poll centers that failed to open or lacked voter rolls. "Our expectation is that Pakistan will not provide safe harbor to terrorists on their western border," Pompeo told reporters when asked about Islamabad's role. "We couldn't have made that message any more clear," he said, adding: "Pakistan will be held to account if they don't achieve that, if they're not sincere in that effort." "Everyone wants a reconciliation in Afghanistan and to achieve that, you can't have a safe harbor for Taliban, for Haqqani and for others inside of Pakistan," he said, listing extremist movements fighting in Afghanistan. President Donald Trump's administration last month cut $300 million in military aid to Pakistan after years of US complaints that Islamabad has kept nurturing ties with militants that target both Afghanistan and rival India. Pakistan has countered that it has paid a heavy price internally for fighting militants and that it can help bring the Taliban to the table.

Friday September 14, 2018 Kabul (BNA) Safiya Wazir, 27, who fled the Taliban with her family in 1997, won an upset victory in a New Hampshire primary. “There can be change, yes. Why not?” she said. It was a mere state house race, below the radar, with fewer than 500 votes cast. But Safiya Wazir’s upset victory in New Hampshire on Tuesday is yet one more striking example of how nontraditional candidates are upending expectations in this extraordinary election season. Ms. Wazir, just 27 and a refugee from Afghanistan, toppled a four-term incumbent in the Democratic primary for state representative in a blue-collar neighborhood of Concord, the state capital. Her opponent was Dick Patten, 66, a former city councilor and former police dispatcher who was first elected to the state legislature in 2010. His campaign focused on immigrants, whom he blamed for “getting everything,” such as welfare benefits, to the detriment of people born and raised in New Hampshire. She beat him, 329 to 143. It was a stunning upset, not just because Ms. Wazir is so young, a woman and new to politics — not to mention relatively new to this country — but because New Hampshire is 94 percent white. Its neighbors, Vermont and Maine, are 95 percent white, making northern New England collectively the nation’s whitest region. Nytimes Ansari

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