20 February 2018

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WASHINGTON: A Pakistani man convicted on terrorism charges has been sentenced to more than four years in jail in the United States over a plot to smuggle a member of the Taliban into the country.

Irfan Ul Haq, 37 -- who last September pleaded guilty along with two other Pakistanis to conspiracy to provide support to a terror organization -- was sentenced to 50 months in jail by a US federal judge in Washington on Thursday.

The other two men were sentenced last month to 40 months and 36 months in prison over the same plot, carried out between January and March 2011. All three men have agreed to return to Pakistan following their sentences.

The three men were arrested in Miami on March 13 last year.

Kabul:( BNA)Pakistan and India on Sunday exchanged lists of their nuclear installations and facilities under a two-decade-old pact prohibiting attacks on atomic assets.

The governments of the two countries are required to exchange lists of their nuclear installations and facilities on January 1 every year under the terms of the "Agreement on Prohibition of Attacks against Nuclear Installations and Facilities" that was signed in December 1988.

This was the 21st consecutive year that the lists of nuclear facilities were exchanged since 1992.

The two sides also exchanged list of prisoners currently being held in each other's jails under a separate pact.

The two countries are required to exchange lists of prisoners twice a year under the Agreement on Consular Access signed in May 2008.

KABUL:BNA) More than 560 ISAF troops  killed Afghanistan with, the second highest number in the 10-year war against the Taliban-led insurgency.

Commanders from the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) say violence is declining following the US military surge which saw an extra 33,000 troops on the ground.


The death toll of coalition service personnel in 2011 was 566 and includes at least 417 from the US and 45 from Britain, according to a tally based on figures from independent website icasualties.org.

The number is down from a wartime high of 711 in 2010 after the start of the surge but up from 521 in 2009.

The toll in 2011 was added to on the final day of the year when Isaf announced a service member had died after a non-battle related incident in the south.

The fatality count has been worsened by several devastating attacks, including the car bombing of an Isaf convoy in Kabul in October which killed 17, and the shooting down of a helicopter in Wardak, south of the capital, in August in which 30 US troops perished.

But it is Afghan civilians who have paid the highest price.

The deadliest attack saw at least 80 people killed in a shrine bombing in Kabul on the day of Ashura in early December , which was carried out by Lashkar-e- Jahnkgawi.

The surge troops -- ordered in by US President Barack Obama two years ago to turn the tide in the war -- have now begun to pull out, with 10,000 already gone and the rest leaving by next autumn.

Since the US-led invasion toppled the Taliban from power in 2001, a total of 2,847 foreign troops have died in the conflict.

"We've seen a considerable reduction in enemy attacks (this year). That's a result of successes on the battle field and a reduction of their capability to attack us," said Isaf spokesman Brigadier General Carsten Jacobson.


The UN said the number of civilians killed in violence in Afghanistan rose by 15 percent in the first six months of this year to 1,462. A full-year report is due out in mid-January.

Insurgents are blamed for 80 percent of the deaths, which are mostly caused by homemade bombs or IEDs.

Nato, which says enemy attacks are down eight percent, only includes "executed attacks" and not IED finds or instances where the Taliban intimidate local people.


As security is handed over the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), which now number more than 300,000, can also expect to take on more casualties.

Since March 21, the beginning of the Afghan year, 1,400 police, 520 soldiers and 4,275 insurgents have been killed in the conflict, according to Afghan government figures.

However, there is some optimism that the reduction in the foreign presence may in itself lead to a fall in violence.


 

Sunday, January 01, 2012
Kabul (BNA) German defense minister had said that, they had achieved their targets in Afghanistan.
A German magazine DER, PEGAL quoted the defense minister as saying that they have reached on getting their major targets in Afghanistan.
Firstly, we saved the country from changing in to a hideout and safe heaven for terrorist net works, particularly AL-Qaida, secondly, We trained and equipped Afghan security forces.
Currently, Afghanistan has its own powerful and strong security force, and they are capable of taking leadership of security responsibilities and to carrying out the military operations by their own.

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